REFLECTION ON WINTER

By SATYO SULLIVAN

This post is a small meditation on the gifts we can gather from winter before it passes us by and we are caught up in the momentum of spring and then summer’s rich intensity. 

This post is a small meditation on the gifts we can gather from winter before it passes us by and we are caught up in the momentum of spring and then summer’s rich intensity. 

What gifts has the winter season been offering you? 

Personally, I want to make sure I am receiving what I see as one of winter’s prime messages….to slow down enough, to rest inwards, to be reflective.  To restore and take into myself the sense of ‘less is best’ before the resurgence of busyness, and possible pressure, that seems more prevalent in our lives from spring to Christmas.  

Here I am, taking a moment to pause with one of the few winter flowers in my Southern Highlands garden, where most plants relax back into the earth to hibernate before their push upwards and outwards to spring. This is the winter rose (or hellebore) a quiet, magical, late winter bloomer. 

What gifts are you gathering from winter, before it disappears, and spring brings it’s own unique mix of demands and delights?

This is the winter rose, or hellebore, a quiet, magical, late winter bloomer. 

Big Red Robe

Sipping a freshly brewed cup of Oolong tea has been a common practice for me since my very early 20’s when I was exposed to Japanese acupuncture, traditional Chinese Medicine, Qi Gong and a multitude of Eastern philosophies, healing and therapeutic arts. Rose buds (mei gui hua) were often added at my first introduction to Oolong tea, which gave it a sweet hue of flavour and fragrance and added health benefits of gently moving stasisof Qi and Blood. Maybe those subtle flavours of the tea associate me with reflections on days of transition into a career that I unintentionally fell into, being immersed in learning from extraordinary teachers and observations on how human beings have an enormous potential to heal. 

Da Hong Pao is known as the ‘King of Tea’s’ and translates to ‘Big Red Robe’ and is possibly the most venerated Oolong tea in China. The tea was celebrated with in the Qing Dynasty and its origins have been traced back to the Ming times and through the Song Dynasty, where it was much adored for its supreme quality and flavours.

There are many legends that tell how Big Red Robe was named. 

One such legend, shared with me by a beautiful friend who has Chinese roots was of a general who was riding on horseback across China and he fell sick. When he arrived in the next village on his journey the people welcomed him in, he took off his big red robe and they gave him a special tea with healing effects to drink. The tea cured him. Thus, it was then named ‘Big Red Robe’. Although I do not advise to drink Oolong tea in the hope of being ‘cured’ of all ills, I often chat in the clinic about the health benefits and properties of Oolong. Oolong is warm in nature, warmer than the less fermented green tea and better for those suffering with cold inside and it contains an array of antioxidants, minerals, vitamins and trace elements.

Another legend of Big Red Robe is a light hearted story about Monks who had planted tea bushes and they had great difficulty accessing the plants as they grew on Rocky Mountain Cliffs. They decided to train monkeys to collect the leaves. They dressed the monkeys in red robes in order to be seen from afar and legend has it that Big Red Robe was named after the red robes worn by these ancient tea pickers.  

So with those legends told I’m off to boil the pot!

What’s your favourite hot healthful brew? 

The Science Behind Gratitude and Why It Can Change Your Life

Gratitude. The word is used so often these days that the practice may seem somewhat new age. But the simple practice of taking time to notice and reflect on the things you are thankful for has significant benefits.  

In fact, people who regularly practice gratitude have been shown to experience more positive emotions, feel more alive, sleep better, express more compassion and kindness. They even have stronger immune systems. 

Best of all, gratitude doesn’t need to be reserved only for the big flashy and fabulous moments in our lives. Sure, we might feel gratitude after receiving a promotion at work, but we can also be thankful for something as simple as a delicious piece of pie, the sun on our face or a smile from a stranger.

Science shows that developing an attitude of gratitude is one of the simplest ways to improve your happiness.

Increased life satisfaction
Research by psychologist Robert Emmons shows that simply keeping a gratitude journal—regularly writing brief reflections on moments for which we’re thankful—can significantly increase well-being and life satisfaction.

Reduced Pain
In a study called Counting Blessings vs. Burdens, ill patients were required to keep a gratitude journal. Sixteen percent of subjects reported reduced symptoms and 10% reported a decrease in pain.

Blocking toxic, negative emotions
Emotions that can destroy our happiness such as envy, resentment and regret can be reduced by practicing gratitude. A 2008 study by psychologist Alex Wood in the Journal of Research in Personality, showed that gratitude can reduce the frequency and duration of episodes of depression.

 Simple and effective ways to practice gratitude
The most commonly cited way to increase gratitude is by keeping a gratitude journal. This can include anything and everything. Start with the myriad of things that so many us take for granted each day such as food, running water and a roof over our heads. Expand your focus to those seemingly insignificant moments and events that serve to educate and motivate or just put a smile on our face. And of course, celebrate the big moments that bring joy and make you grateful.
Try looking for new things each day; gratitude for your family and work colleagues. Gratitude for advice given, thoughts shared, and emotions felt.   
How to make gratitude a social and shared practice
• Write a gratitude letter to someone who had an impact on you whom you may have never properly thanked.
• Keep a gratitude jar on your own, or with your partner, among all your family or at your workplace. How? Take a moment to reflect on what you are grateful for, note it and place it in the gratitude jar. Share contents as a group or maybe pick a day a week when you read them, or just dip in individually when you need to reboot your feelings of gratitude.
• Cultivate a habit of sharing grateful moments around the dinner table
We all have the ability and opportunity to cultivate gratitude. Make it a focus in your life over the next few weeks. You will be pleasantly surprised at the benefits that arise from simply taking a few moments to focus on all that you have.

By Gabrielle Booty

Here our holistic counsellor, psychotherapist and Kahuna body worker Sandy Beech reflects on looking at your own beliefs, values and triggers and healing through your own eyes…

As a holistic counsellor and psychotherapist, I understand the importance of working on my own healing through constantly looking at my own beliefs, values and triggers.

Recently i was away on a trip to the beautiful gold coast to celerbrate my friends 50th and I noticed the emotions I felt were not what I wanted for the weekend. They were fuelled with uncertainty and fear and I was unsure why. I had my husband with me to share the weekend. We were to swim each day, eat at beautiful cafes and share beautiful conversations and still I knew something didn’t feel right.

I had then to rely on my training and experience to work with these feeling so the weekend wouldn’t be ruined by my own internal reactions. I was reacting within myself to everything around me, my past experiences, my future ones and thus continually creating more fear.

This feeling stayed with me and I looked internally at what my emotion was stemming from which were ultimately past fears and future projections.

Then in one moment it all changed as I stopped in my tracks on the beach, I felt the sun on my back, the sand beneath my toes and opened my arms wide to the sky. I felt gratitude for this moment and again realised that I don’t need to be perfect, I don’t need to know all the outcomes and all I need is right now.

The healing is continual, ongoing and what a blessing it is to know it is always attainable.

Needless to say, the weekend was a hit and I had a wonderful time, although, if I hadn’t sat with these emotions, felt them with awareness and accepted I was allowed to feel this way given my past experiences, I may not have had the same felt experience.

It is the same with everyone who reacts instead of responds to experiences that they are challenged with.

The parts of our personality determine how our lives are run.

Do you remember the movie “Inside out?”

Well, next time you feel yourself reacting to someone or something, ask yourself who is this really? Is it Anger, impatience, fear or another emotion? Acknowledging the emotion then allows you to give yourself compassion and love for all of your parts as they each hold messages and need to connect with each other.

This is called Recourse Therapy and the belief is that our personality is made up of multifaceted parts, rather than being a homogeneous whole. These parts, which we all have are called Recourses available to help us.

(also known as Advanced Ego State Therapy as developed by Professor Gordon Emmerson PhD)

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